Polish Women as Forced Laborers in Nazi Germany

Cover of Wearing the Letter P - Polish Women as forced laborers in Nazi Germany 1939-1945 Polish women sent as forced labor to Nazi Germany during World War II is an under-reported war crime inflicted against Polish civilians by Germany. Germans considered Poles to be untermenschen or subhuman, only suitable for slave labor to the superior German race. Until I encountered the book Wearing the Letter P: Polish Women as Forced Laborers in Nazi Germany, 1939-1945 by Sophie Hodorowicz Knab (Hippocrene Books 2016) I had no idea of this facet of World War II. An estimated 1.7 million civilians were forced into slave labor and sent to Germany, the majority of them young women. Continue reading

Author Profile: James Conroyd Martin, Author of The Boy Who Wanted Wings, and the Poland Trilogy

Author James Conroyd MartinMeet James Conroyd Martin, author of The Boy Who Wanted Wings, and the Poland Trilogy: Push Not the River, Against a Crimson Sky, and Warsaw Conspiracy. Martin’s books are considered historical fiction but mirror true events. Each one takes place at the time of a significant event or era in Polish history. They make for an entertaining read whether you are familiar with Polish history or not. Martin is of Irish and Norwegian descent, but after a friend shared the diary of a Polish countess from the late eightenth century, he thoroughly believed the story should be turned into a book. He has been studying Polish history ever since.

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Author Profile: Greg Archer, Author of Grace Revealed, a Memoir

October is Polish Heritage Month, which is a perfect time to introduce a new monthly  blog feature: Author Profiles. Meet Greg Archer, author of Grace Revealed, a Memoir

Greg Archer grew up Polish in Chicago. His book, Grace Revealed, a Memoir, explores his Polish family’s history as victims of Jozef Stalin’s mass deportation of more than one million Polish citizens to the frozen Siberian Gulags in early 1940. Most people know that Hitler launched an invasion against Poland on September 1, 1939, leading to a declaration of war two days later. I submit that far fewer people, especially outside of the Polish community, are fully aware of the true scope of horrendous crimes Stalin waged against Poland.

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The Warsaw Uprising began August 1, 1944

Warsaw Uprising Monument

Warsaw Uprising Monument. Photo credit www.thevisitor.pl

The Warsaw Uprising began August 1, 1944 as a heroic, catastrophic last stand against the Germans, and ended 63 days later with the death of more than 200,000 Poles, the majority civilians. After nearly five years of German occupation, the Russians were advancing from the east, sending German troops into retreat. The Germans had begun evacuating Warsaw. In July 20, a failed assassination attempt on Hitler revealed a huge coalition of top German officials complicit in their perceived need to murder Hitler. And, Soviet aircraft even dropped leaflets in Warsaw exhorting people to rise up in armed action. On the surface, it sounded like a good time to revolt. History played out differently.

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