Reports of a Hidden Nazi Train Mean Gold for Poland.

nazi trainReports of a hidden Nazi train possibly carrying gold and valuables, hidden in a mountain tunnel in southwest Poland have set off a world-wide frenzy of curiosity. The Polish government just confirmed there is a train and they know where it is. The Russians, the World Jewish Congress, and two treasure hunters who claim ten percent for the find, are already fighting for what they consider their rightful share. However under Polish law the find belongs to the state of Poland.

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Celebrating Ukrainian Independence Day

ukraine candy katrinaUkrainian Independence Day celebrates the day the Eastern European country achieved independence in 1991, after the fall of the Soviet Union. Saturday night a group of Ukrainians and a large contingent of supportive Poles gathered for a dinner dance in Phoenix to honor Ukrainian Independence Day and raise funds for Ukrainian soldiers fighting in defense of pro-Russian separatists supported by Russia’s Vladimir Putin. fEven a warm banquet hall didn’t stop the dancing and fun, although I swear some of the meat platters on the dinner tables started sizzling it was so warm in the building.

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Historic Krakow for the Vision Impaired

Model - wawel castle watermarkCast metal displays in historic Krakow for the vision impaired represent miniature versions of major sights. I find this secondary art form in Krakow fascinating, in that even a seeing person can grasp a detailed bird’s eye view of these sights. They have signage in Braille, as well as other languages. Somewhere on each display is a small brass peg representing the height of a human, so that a vision-impaired person might perceive the actual size and shape of these buildings.

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Janusz Korczak: Courageous Champion of Children

Janusz korzcak portrai ushmmThe story of Janusz Korczak (1878 – 1942), a Jewish pediatrician, author and champion of children’s rights is one of courage, conviction and sacrifice. Korczak established a Jewish children’s orphanage in Warsaw around 1919 and remained its director until his death. After war broke out, the Germans forced the orphanage to move into the Warsaw Ghetto in 1940. On August 5, 1942, the Germans came to deport the more than 190 orphans to the gas chambers of Treblinka. Korczak, along with this staff, refused to abandon the children. All were murdered upon their arrival at Treblinka, August 7, 1942.

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